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question, one of the rules of law i think has got to be a first priority for us all, and then within that as we seek for women's rights, they're human rights, we have got to stop exaggerating, as the u.n. system has done for so much, abortion as the leading thing that is being fought for for women. we need -- if we want to help their reproductive health, we need to be not only calling for marriage at a later age but making sure that their sexual end engagement happens in a place that is security and -- >> that's such a red herring. these people can't afford -- you know, look, this -- you mentioned the economic imperative. it's there. but it's worse than that because it's now become cultural as well, so that even if you are well off, you are supposed to choose the bride for -- or to choose the groom for -- because that assures that for the rest of her life she will be taken care of. i think this is very, very difficult, but i am sure who the messengers must be. >> behind the headlines, wage theft. it's a little known problem affecting vulnerable women across the country which is costi
people and some of the authorities thought they could interpret the law to suit their own purposes. that is why the officials signed the documents. it was not until a few years later that they were audited to see if they had violated their own laws. >> with the director is not mentioning is corruption. officials back then issued permits to relatives and friends and just helped themselves. a former mayor approved these houses and had his own construction company build them. officially, the job was noted down as renovating old fisherman's hut that once stood here. >> i do not envy the homeowners. they are innocent and bought the properties in good faith as the third or fourh owners. now they have got to cope with the ruling of the cour their houses will be torn down. >> the enterprising mayor has long since died and cannot be brought to justice. the other corrupt officials are no longer in office. when a legal structure has already been torn down -- a wealthy latvian build a grand new summer residence for himself on an existing foundation right next door to the former summer home of
't prosper without rule of law. because that is ectly our main focus, in the sense that we are not prosecuting drugs by drugs themselves. we are looking for rule of law in mexico. we want a country in which the law prevails. otherwise it will be impossible to prosper or to have a fair society. >> rose: we continue talking about google ventures with kevin rose and bill maris. >> we're investing in teams and people more than products at the early stages. so you're looking for larry and certificate guy as they were starting out they are what made google different from lycos and the other search engines. >> rose: we con chrood with the photography of brigitte lacombe. >> she asked would we be interested in doing something similar for london olympic on women in sport. and of course, i mean, it was just like a great opportunity because i mean for me andlso for my sister to discover the new world, i know nothing about sports. and it was very intriguing. >> rose: yes. >> and so of course we said yes. >> rose: felipe calderon, bill regard maris, kevin rose and brigitte lacombe when
federal law by endorsing political candidates from the pulpit. those who do so risk losing their churches' tax-exempt status. according to a recent survey by the christian polling organization lifeway, 87% of pastors believe pastors should refrain from making political endorsements. the survey included both evangelical and mainline clergy. >>> the supreme court opened its new term on monday and a majority of the justices -- six of the nine -- attended the annual red mass, held the nday before at st. matthew's cathedral in washington. at the annual event, catholic leaders encourage the justices to draw wisdom from their faith as they make their decisions. the court is set to tackle controversial issu oncagain this term, includina case involving affirmative action at the university of texas. many religious groups are anxious to see if the court will also agree to hear arguments on same-sex marriage. >>> a leading opponent of same-sex marriage, catholic bishop salvatore cordileone, has been elevated to archbishop of san francisco. cordileone was formally installed in a ceremony on thursday.
new. >> here's what conservatives tell me. they embrace law and order conceptually and they say we're talking about enforcing the law and if the law isn't enforced a society cannot hold itself cohesively together. the second thing they say is we can't have a cohesive, coherent country without a common language. if you have two peoples living side by side speaking separate languages, you're not going to have a country. >> we heard the arguments. as far as the language is concerned, everyone knows english is the official language in the country. why is it necessary to make it officl by law? i think there's more draw backs to that because, for example, in california when they tried to make english the official language it was virtually impossible. it didn't work. it was approved, but it didn't work. why? because you have so many different languages that are spoken there. besides spanish you have several asian languages. what would happen is in the schools, the schools would be forced to send all materials to parents in english when you have elderly who do not speak the language and wh
to equal protection under the law. >> we've recognized that there are some interests in diversity that are beneficial in the educational sphere. but we have said and we continue toay that is not an overriding consideration that has to be administered very narrowly because it's an odious and dangerous classification. >> ifill: but university president bill powers argued that concern is trumped by the need for a diverse student body. >> we believe the educational benefits of diversity are so important that they're worth fighting for all way to the united states supreme court. our lawyers this morning effectively made the case to the justices that diversity-- ethnic and otherwise-- benefits all of the students on our campus. >> ifill: the high court last visited the issue in 2003, deciding five to four to let the university of michigan law school could use race as one factor in its admissions process. before then, the university of texas guaranteed acceptance for the top 10% of students at every high school in the state. but after the michigan decision, texas and other schools added
ensure that they wouldn't be subject to iraqi laws, iraqi courts and so forth. that was the recommendation of the chairman of the joint chiefs. it was clearly the right thing to do at that point. but this was a political decision by prime minister maliki, not some technical issue in the negotiations. >> woodruff: let me ask you abt anher parof the world, peter feaver. that is china. we heard governor romney say... he cited again and again the need for the united states to take the lead around the world. he said the u.s. should use its great influence to shape events. then he talked about china's recent assertiveness in the pacific region. what would he have the united states do right now to shape events with china? >> well, there has been some bipartisanship on east asia. so the obama administration after flirting with a dierent policyn 20 returned to an emphasis on asia that had been there in the previous administration. there was an emphasis that involved strengthening our alliances with japan and india and presenting to china a clear choice about we will coo
of security, the cousins of the banking system, in-laws in security as well, and military. so the reality is, this is a family business. >> narrator: like saddam hussein in iraq, assad's ba'ath party repressed any ethnic or religious challenges. >> the ba'ath party promised to get rid of sectarianism. he demanded, and for the most part the syrian population was receptive to, this faustian bargain that the syrian people would accept less freedom and liberty in return for stability. >> narrator: he took in millions in soviet military aid and formed an alliance with iran, which still endures. >> the relationship with iran is very unusual. syria is a secular state ruled by a secular arab nationalist party, the ba'ath party. iran is an islamic republic. so they don't seem to be a marriage made in heaven. but it's a symbiotic relationship that's based on strategic necessity. >> it's not a particularly natural alliance, if you will. but for reasons of common enmity towards iraq, towards israel and other regions, they did form this alliance that has been the strongest, the most enduring in the regio
abortion providers. >> you find that, along with the culture of death, go all kinds of other law breaking-- not following good sanitary procedure, giving abortions to women who are not actually pregnant, cheating on taxes, all these kinds of tngs. >> ifill:ccaskill'samign ads remind voters of akin's comments. >> on march 16, akin said he wants to abolish the minimum wage. on april 21, said he would eliminate student loans. and on august 19, todd akin said only some rapes are "legitimate." what will he say next? >> ifill: but mccaskill has her own problems. romney is well ahead in missouri, and more than half of the voters here disapprove of president obama. she says she remains independent. >> i think the president, if he were in missouri, he would say to missourians what i hope they know about me, and that is i can be a real pain. i am not someone who does what he wants me to do at his beck and call. i have said no to him. it doesn't mean i don't support him; it just means i have a strong objective record of independence. >> ifill: akin is happy to remind voters she voted for both his he
them but within a certain rulof law, that countries that do that -- and countries that keep their international agreements, i.e., the treaty with israel, countries that do that do well in the modern world. and we should basically be saying "you live up to those principles and we will be happy to partner with you on your schools, on programs to promote literacy, on programs to empower women, on programs to build a stronger electoral politics." but i think we need to make very clear that have's there's a ally imrtant principl for me, charlie. the middle east only puts a smile on your face when it starts with them. that is, if we're cramming things down their throat that they don't really want it's not going to happen. and one of the things that i really believe is that the initiative's got to come from them. one thing we must not do, though and it's something we've done for, i think, 40 years, is kind of view it like we need them more than they need us. oh, no, if we actually make these demands on them for this kind of politics, this kind of treatment of women, this kind of ed
minister that the islands are inherent japanese territory. cytosaid international law and history have confirmed this. japan controls the islands while china and taiwan claim them. he said japan hopes to resolve the dispute in a rational and peaceful way. he said the meeting helped him understand the historical context and he supports a peaceful settlement of the issue. he told reporters japan has no plan to raise the issue at summit meetings of asean members and other asia pific nations and ja fan and china are expected to take part in the summit in cambodia. >>> academics and students discussed ways to ease tensions between the feuding neighbors. we hone in on what the young people are saying about it. >> reporter: the symposium was originally supposed to be one of the events marking 40 years of diplomatic relations between chinand japan. the senkaku dispute cast a long shadow. >> the days of japan-china friendship may be over. >> i think the situation offers an opportunity for students and citizens who have been indifferent to develop an interest in japan-china relations. >> reporte
chinese law at this time. our concern really was a national security concern but it's also a concern about competition. you know, we do not want a chinese government to have the ability to spy on americans who might be huway or z.t.e. customers. we do not want them to be able to spy on our businesses. let me just say this. last year the united states, pursuant to cyber command, the united states lost over 300 billion dollars of trade secrets. that's $300 billion of trade secrets as a result of cyber attacks. >> brown: but excuse me, but is there... is it the lack of evidence? i mean the lack of them being clear with you or is there evidence that they might do something? >> we also have evidence. we have evidence that the chinese government have been doing it. as far as huiwei is concerned we have gotten a lot of data and information about huiwei but most of our concern is the relationship between their government. >> brown: you heard that the company pushed back pretty hard after this report came out. they accuse... they said little more than an exercise in china-bashing. >> the first thin
. and online tonight-- some comic book heroes defy the laws of physics; others get the science right. hari sreenivasan explains. >> sreenivasan: so how much silk does spider-man need to swing through new york city? we talked to one physics professor who is trying to bring science fiction a little closer to science fact. plus, will the new health care law cover non-citizens? yes, if they're here legally. find tat story from our partners at kaiser health news on the rundown. and on tonight's edition of "need to know," ray moderates a roundtable discussion about the fiscal cliff and congress's deadline to deal with expiring tax cuts and automatic spending cuts. find a link to "need to know" and much more at newshour.pbs.org. judy. >> woodruff: and that's the newshour for tonight. on monday, we'll talk with npr's peter overby about spending by super-pacs on campaign ads. i'm judy woodruff. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. "washington week" can be seen later this evening on most pbs stations. we'll see you online and again here monday evening. have a nice weekend. thank you and good night. >> m
.d. suppression laws, barriers to understanding the deadlines and when you need to vote -- register to vote, to go out and vote. there is language barriers autos well. going out to vote most of these women and men that latinos, hard working, working not just 9:00 to 5:00 they're working the dawn, early hours then until very late. that's another barrier that you can do why latino community is not coming out. but i'm optimistic i think the number will be 12 million for this year. >> that would be good. 50% of eligible. >> it's always a challenge with a younger population, younger people are challenged to vote and so i think that that then becomes exacerbated when you look at the latino vote. i'm very optimistic. in my state of maryland we have something as driver, maryland dream act that will be on our ballot that is great in seven i have to vote. also in addition to removing those barriers, expanding opportunities to vote whether it's early voting or late polling hours those are rlly important to get people out who are in fact hard working and doing lots of other things in their lives. >> as you sa
their students for decades. by state law, three quarters of u.t.'s students are accepted automatically, because they are in the top 10% of their high school classes. the rest go through what the university calls a holistic review, considering factors, like grades, essays, personal experiences and race. even fewer students got in that way in 2008, when fisher didn't make the cut. >> there are going to be certain financial consequences to this young lady because she could not attend the school of her preference. as u.t. says, it is critical within texas to be a u.t. graduate. she can't have that back. >> reporter: but the university has the support of some of the biggest companies in the country. they include dow components like dupont, i.b.m., johnson and johnson, and walmart, who say they depend on colleges to train a diverse pool of potential employees. the companies filed a brief together saying, "the only means of obtaining a properly qualifiegroup of employees is through diversity in institutions of higher education." other groups mirrored the concerns that our labor force would suffer with
on banking reform. morgan ricks is now assistant professor of law at vanderbilt university. more-- morgan w what do you think here, should the government cap the size of big bank, this is turning out to be a very controversial topic, once again. >> yes, it is. and dan tarullo is one of the best thinkers we have on these issues. so when he speaks we should all listen carefully. on this question, though, i would respectfully take a slightly different view. and one way of thinking about this is during the financial crisis in late 2008, when lehman brothers failed we all remember it almost brought down the whole financial system. lehman brothers was a fairly small firm. at least compared to the giant financial firms we have today including jp pore began, bank of america, citigroup and so on. jpmorgan, those three groups vq size of the sizf lehman brothers before it went bankrupt. and this suggests that maybe size isn't the characteristic we ought to be targeting. >> and so what are you saying? >> don't cap the size, what's the alternative if one ask concerned about this too big to fail issue. >
it working right now. >> because you changed the law. >> let me ask you, if it could help solve the problem, why not very slowly raise the medicare eligibility age by two years as congressman ryan suggests. >> look, i was there when we did that with social security. in 13. i was one of eight people sitting in the room that included tip o'neill negotiating with president reagan. we all got together and everybody said as long as everybody's in the deal, everybody is in the deal, and everybody is making some sacrifice, we can find a way. we made the system solvent to 2033. we will not, though, be part of any voucher plan eliminating-- the voucher says mom, when are you 65, go out there, shop for the best insurance you can get. you'rout of medicare, can you can buy back if if you want with this voucher which will not keep pace, will not keep pace with health-care cost. because if it did keep pace with health-care costs there would be no savings. that is why they go the voucher. we will be no part of a voucher program or the privatization of social security. >> a vouch certificate you go to your
have enacted laws against bullying. educators there are taken a different approach. >> reporter: in new jersey a new anti-bullying law took effect from september 2011. the state law once bullying is observed schools are required to look into it immediately, notify parents and take steps to tackle it. this middle school has the anti-bully bill of rights. the school counselor was appointed last year as the school's anti-bullying specialist. >> this is my anti-bullying bible. >> reporter: the law requires each school district to create its on antibullying program. the program sets out detail procedure to follow when bullying occurs and steps for dealing with the bully. when bullying is reported, they begin the investigation and contact offender. they also contact after school counseling. the law stipulates the student can be suspended or expelled and reported to the police if it's serious. >> the benefit about the law is it's a must so every school district has to handle a report in the same way. there's no gray area and it's not something that is really subjective. >> japan has no laws de
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)